The Inkey List 10% Urea Dry and Rough Skin Solution – Claims | Doctors Review

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When I tell you The Inkey Lists 10% Urea Moisturizer – Dry and Rough Skin Solution reminds me of a foot cream, but in a good way, that isn’t really going to sell it to you, is it?

 

A black and white tube of The Inkey List 10% Urea Moisturizer - Rough and Dry Skin Solution standing in front of a dark background with white flowers
The Inkey List 10% Urea Moisturizer – Rough and Dry Skin Solution

 

It isn’t the texture, just to be clear, the texture is lovely and not similar to the really thick stuff I tend to slather my feet with. No, it is the 10% Urea that I always associate with products made to soften rough skin, and the distinct scent these products have.

No more foot talk though, let’s focus on what I thought of this face cream.

 

 

What The Inkey List 10% Urea Moisturizer – Rough and Dry Skin Solution claims

A clinically proven, fast absorbing moisturiser formulated with 10% Urea that delivers instant hydration to very dry skin. It gently exfoliates rough skin, leaving skin soothed and delaying dryness for up to 48 hours.

 

Facts about the The Inkey Lists 10% Urea Moisturizer

Prize and size

One tube in the typical black and white The Inkey List packaging contains 50 ml and is available for 20 € on the website here. That is along the price point of other, newer moisturizers from the brand, but more expensive than the older ones.

It is fragrance-free and vegan. (More info: Is fragrance in your skincare products dangerous?)

 

Texture and smell

I already mentioned the scent, which is a faint ammonia scent typical for products with Urea, but really very faint and not something to shy away from – it is not like stepping into a public restroom. The cream itself is white, feels like a firm lotion – I had expected something richer – and spreads easily.

 

A close up of The Inkey List 10% Urea Moisturizer on a mirrored surface, looking like a lotion in creamy white
It feels like a lotion

 

How to use The Inkey Lists 10% Urea Moisturizer

Once applied to the skin it has more body than I initially expected and leaves some tackiness behind. While it could be used both morning and night, my skin – less oily than it used to be now that I am 45, but still far from dry – only likes it at night. (More info: The best skincare routine for your 40s and beyond)

After application the skin feels incredibly plump, glowing and thoroughly hydrated, and that feeling of intense hydration stays for hours. I mean, I have not tested the 48 hour claim as I wash my face more frequent than that, but I could still feel the effect the next morning.

 

Ingredients of The Inkey Lists 10% Urea Moisturizer

Hover the mouse over an ingredient for short explanation. Read more on INCIDecoder.
Now I have to tell you what bugs me when I combine the claims and the ingredient list: The exfoliation claim. Yes, Urea is keratolytic, meaning it exfoliates and is used for that purpose in skin diseases that come with dry and scaly patches, Psoriasis for example. (More info: Everything you need to know about Psoriasis) But it only exfoliates at high enough concentration, and that “high enough” merely starts at 10%. In products really aiming to exfoliate, it is used with up to 40%. So while yes, at 10% you might have the faint beginning of some exfoliation, it is still mostly hydrating. Technically not wrong to claim exfoliation here, but it somehow doesn’t sit right with me either.

Urea is a great humectant though, it is part of the so called Natural Moisturizing Factors, and it is paired with Glycerin to enhance this effect. (More info: The benefits of Natural Moisturizing Factors in skincare explained)

Then you have Colloidal Oat Meal, great for soothing eczema prone skin as well as Squalane and Safflower Seed Oil for extra richness. (More info: The benefits of Colloidal Oat Meal in skincare explained)

More info: How to read the ingredient list of your skincare products

 

Does it live up to its claims?

Yes.

With the above mentioned exception that I don’t think the exfoliating effect will be noticeable. But it is there in theory, so technically the claim is right.

 

How does it compare to…

 

A pot of Alpha-H High Tide Water Cream standing in front of a dark background with white flowers.
Alpha-H High Tide Water Cream

 

Alpha-H High Tide Water Cream

Despite the name “Water Cream” that made me immediately think of something lightweight, the High Tide cream from Alpha-H is quite hydrating, and that is surely at least in parts due to the fact that it as well contains Urea as a humectant. They don’t disclose the percentage, but I am pretty sure it is at less than 10% – the only products I had around that feature 10% or more of it are actually a hand and a foot cream. It feels less rich than The Inkey Lists offer, so if you fall into the “rough an dry skin” category, you surely are better off with that one. If you are on a budget, you are better off with it too, there is no denying that Alpha-H is on the pricier side. In terms of texture and experience though, Alpha-H would be my favorite.

You can read my full review of the Alpha-H High Tide Water Cream here.

 

One tube of La Roche Posay Cicaplast Baume B5+ Repairing Cream standing before white flowers on a dark background
La Roche Posay Cicaplast Baume B5+ Repairing Cream

 

La Roche Posay Cicaplast Baume B5+ Repairing Cream

La Roche Posay is what I usually reach for when my skin is dry and rough, although it is less pleasant in texture than the one from The Inkey List and doesn’t contain any Urea. Instead it puts the focus on Panthenol and Centella Asiatica, both of which I really enjoy in my products when my skin acts up again.

You can read my full review of the La Roche Posay Cicaplast Baume B5+ Repairing Cream here.

 

A tube of the Murad Quick Relief Moisture Treatment, silver with a white and blue label
Murad Quick Relief Moisture Treatment

 

Murad Quick Relief Moisture Treatment

Murads version is a treatment rather than a moisturizer, so it is supposed to be used in affected areas only and in the serum step rather than all over as a moisturizer. I still like to use it all over instead of a moisturizer and it really works wonders in getting my skin back on track. Unlike The Inkey List product it is aimed at eczema prone skin rather than those suffering from Psoriasis, and to back up that claim it focusses on Colloidal Oatmeal alongside other soothing ingredients.

You can read my full review of the Murad Quick Relief Moisture Treatment here.

 

Would I repurchase and which skin types do I recommend the The Inkey Lists 10% Urea Moisturizer to?

Despite me not being happy with the exfoliating claims in The Inkey Lists 10% Urea Dry and Rough Skin Solution, I admit I really rate the product for its amazing hydrating properties. It leaves my skin deeply hydrated and plump for hours and, at least during the colder months, works well at night on my normal skin. If your skin is dry, you might get on with it even better.

 

The Inkey List Dry and Rough Skin Supersolution Review
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