facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner – Is that the right name? | Doctors Review

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Pore reduction seems to be a popular topic, and believe me, as someone with oily skin I get that, so facetheory has a dedicated product for that. It is called facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner and has, as you might have guessed Ceramides, hence the Cera, and a Vitamin C derivative, hence the -C.

 

A travel size of the facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner standing in front of a dark background with white flowers
The facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner in a travel size

 

Usually toners aimed at pore care contain Salicylic Acid as oil soluble exfoliant, but this one doesn’t. It is more of a soothing formula that claims to balance oil, promote elasticity and minimize pore size due to the ceramides and Niacinamide it contains.

 

 

What the facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner T1 claims

A lightweight toner formulated with ceramides and 5% niacinamide (vitamin B3) to balance oil, promote elasticity, and minimize pore size.

 

Facts about the facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner T1

Prize and size

The full size toner contains 200 ml and is available for 18 € on the website here. It is unscented and, like all facetheory products, vegan.

 

Texture and smell

The brand calls it lightweight and I agree with that. It is quite runny, has no scent and if it weren’t for the slightly yellowish tint, you could easily mistake it for water.
That also means that with the huge opening of the bottle makes someone like me prone to spilling it everywhere.

 

Close up of the facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner, which looks like water with a slight yellow tint, on a mirrored surface.
It has a slight yellow hue, probably because it contains a Vitamin C derivative.

 

How to use the facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner T1

The spilling could be avoided when, as the website advises, you use a cotton pad to apply, but I admit I rarely do that. I cleanse, then I pour some toner in the palm of my hand and pat it in. (More info: What is a toner and do you need to use one?)

Depending on your preferences, you can use it both morning or night. As it contains a small percentage of Lactic Acid, you might not be able to use it daily if your skin is reactive or you use other irritating skincare like prescription retinoids, but in general I think a concentration that low should not be a problem. (More info: Does the Seven Skin method actually work?)

I also think it can be paired with everything else in your routine without issues, so it shouldn’t be a problem to fit in your routine.

 

Ingredients of the facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner T1

Hover the mouse over an ingredient for short explanation. Read more on INCIDecoder.
You don’t see ceramides in a toner that often, usually they come as part of a cream or lotion, and looking at the ingredient list you might wonder where they are, as nothing is listed as Ceramide specifically. (More info: Everything you need to know about the benefits of Ceramides in your skincare)

Well, the Glycosphingolipids you see here have a ceramide part and are part of the cells membranes, so either that is what they refer to or, another good explanation, they count on the fact that Niacinamide and Lactic Acid both stimulate Ceramide production in the skin. (More info: Everything you need to know about the benefits of Niacinamide in your skincare)

Niacinamide is present at 5%, meaning both the Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate, a Vitamin C derivative, and the Lactic Acid have a concentration lower than that, meaning the exfoliating effect of the Lactic Acid is probably quite gentle. (More info: Everything you need to know about the benefits of Vitamin C in skincare)

You can also find Panthenol, again in less than 5 % concentration, for soothing and Glycerin and Betaine as humectants. (More info: Everything you need to know about the benefits of Panthenol in your skincare)

More info: How to read the skincare ingredient list

 

Does it live up to its claims?

Hm.

Niacinamide and Vitamin C do have the potential to influence oil production and skin elasticity, but both are only two factors in what determines pore size, the more instant effect would come through in pore exfoliation to prevent the pores from being dilated. (More info: How to make your pores look smaller)  So I guess it technically lives up to its claims, but if pore size would be my main concern, I would use something else to address that.

 

How does it compare to…

 

A bottle of Real Barrier Extreme Essence Toner standing in front of a dark background with white flowers
Real Barrier Extreme Essence Toner

 

Real Barrier Extreme Essence Toner

This is a toner containing actual ceramides alongside other skin barrier friendly lipids, and one that I love a lot for soothing my skin (despite the lavender oil it contains that might be problematic for some). There is no Niacinamide and no Vitamin C derivative here to influence oil production in the skin, and the texture is thicker.

You can read my full reviw of the Real Barrier Extreme Essence Toner here.

 

pixi Vitamin C Tonic Review
pixi Vitamin C Tonic

 

pixi Vitamin C Tonic

pixi offers a toner with Vitamin C and Phospholipids here that is in comparison lacking the Niacinamide. It uses L-Ascorbic Acid instead of a derivative though, which I prefer, but which also means it is more prone to oxidation. I tend to get my Vitamin C from my serum, but if I didn’t, I would probably prefer pixis version.

You can read my full review of the pixi Vitamin C Tonic here.

 

Paulas Choice Skin Perfecting 2% BHA Liquid Exfoliant Review
Paulas Choice Skin Perfecting 2% BHA Liquid Exfoliant – the travel size

 

Paula’s Choice Skin Perfecting 2% BHA Liquid Exfoliant

Now if pore size would be the issue I wanted to target, I would rely on Paula’s choice over the version from facetheory, simply because the in pore exfoliation from the salicylic acid offers great and quick results that prevent the pore from being stretched out in the first place. Any BHA toner will have that effect, but I find Paula’s Choice version to be very gentle on my skin, which is why I keep repurchasing.

You can read my full review of the Paula’s Choice Skin Perfecting 2% BHA Liquid Exfoliant here. 

 

Would I repurchase and which skin types do I recommend it to?

I admit that while I like this toner, I am unsure about the naming. Pore reduction had me expecting something different, and while a potential reduction in pore size due to less oiliness with Niacinamide or due to increased collagen with Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate is possible, both are not the most effective ingredients to pick for that purpose. For me it is much rather a soothing toner, although I don’t perceive it as very hydrating.

As long as you don’t react badly to any of the ingredients, it should work for all skin types.

 

facetheory Cera-C Pore Reducing Toner Review
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